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Breaking Down Silos to Build a More Agile Workforce with Rachelle Snook

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Today’s episode of the show features Rachelle Snook of WD-40 Company. Rachelle has been with her company for over a decade, and her role includes advising global leaders on talent, organizational design, career progression, workforce planning, and talent acquisition. Rachelle is also involved in the student community of San Diego, sitting on the board of both San Diego State University and the University of San Diego. Before diving into her current work and its emphasis on a new and more agile mindset, Rachelle shares about her non-linear career path from accounting to talent acquisition. 

Turning to Rachelle’s work with WD-40, the group focuses on her efforts to grow agility, in part, by doing away with a territorial mindset. One of Rachelle’s major aims has been to remove silos separating business units, or at least to soften the edges between them by fostering cooperative efforts among the different units. This effort, which includes a shift toward a more project-based model, has been driven by changes in workforce context. With the remaining effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and incoming workers’ insistence on more flexible roles (an insistence Rachelle is very familiar with from her work with students), Rachelle and her colleagues have felt the need to adapt and invite hesitant leaders to take small, trusting steps to do the same.

As WD-40 has altered its model to feature inter-unit projects (which generally take about 15-20% of employees’ time), Rachelle has explored the mindset, culture, and HR roles needed to see the company and its employees thrive under this model. The project-based model of WD-40 enables the company to build its own bench from within and attain a high level of internal mobility. It also shapes the company’s hiring practices, as WD-40 needs team members aligned with its values and eager to learn and innovate.  As the episode wraps up, Rachelle offers parting thoughts on equity and how companies interested in the WD-40 journey can get started.

Links:

Learn more about Rachelle Snook and WD-40 Company.

Talent Transformation – Building a More Agile Workforce

Ligia:

Welcome to the new talent code, a podcast with practical insights, dedicated to empowering change agents in HR to push the envelope in their talent functions. We’re your hosts. I’m Lee Zora

Jason:

And I’m Jason Serato. We’re bringing you the best thought leaders in the talent space to share stories about how they are designing the workforce of the future. Transforming processes, rethinking old constructs and leveraging cutting edge technology to solve. Today’s pressing talent issues. It’s what we call the new talent code.

Ligia:

So if you’re looking for practical, actionable advice to get your workforce future ready, you’ve come to the right place.

Speaker 3:

Hello,

Ligia:

Hello, and welcome again to the new talent code. I’m Leia and I’m here with my co-host Jason. Hi Jason.

Jason:

Hello, Leia. How are you?

Ligia:

Well, I’m a little bit under the weather recovering from a head cold, but you know, what’s new. The reality is I am really excited about today’s topic. So I grabbed a cup of coffee and some cold medicine and jumped outta bed because well, the show must go on and actually I’m super excited. I’ll jokes aside. We have an amazing, amazing guest today. Rachel Snook. Hello, Rachel. Welcome to the show.

Rachelle:

Hi, great to be here. Thanks for having me.

Ligia:

Absolutely. Let me tell everybody about your impressive background. Rochelle has been with the WD 40 company for over a decade. Yes, people w D 40. We’re talking about that blue and yellow can with the little red top. It’s amazing what they’ve built out at this company in her role. She advises global leaders on pretty much everything related to talent, organizational design, career progression, workforce planning, even talent acquisition, you name it. And more importantly, Rochelle is involved with the student community in San Diego, where she sits on the boards of San Diego state university and U S D. So we have quite a bit to cover today, but before we get started on the core topic of today, we’re gonna be talking about how you’ve brought about strategies to bring agility into the workforce and my favorite topic, internal mobility. So first we start off every podcast with a fun question, just so we get to break the ice and learn a little bit more about you. We are fascinated on this podcast with the concept of non-linear career paths, and we are firm believers that people really should, can, and should try out new things in their careers because you know, at the end of the day, they should be hired for potential. So with that, tell us a little bit more about your own experience, your career path. How exactly did you get started in the talent space?

Rachelle:

Yeah, I’m a big believer in pivoting, right? If something’s not working and, and we’ve got a passion in different area, let’s, let’s go for it. Empower our people to do that. I vividly remember in the middle of high school, my grandfather sat me down with my brother and he said, look, let’s explore career options. People need to eat. People need somewhere to live and people need people to manage their money. So my brother was a gold plate chef. He was in construction and I went into accounting. I thought it would be a great career path. I did enjoy the learning. And after I graduated, I spent about four or five months auditing at ston young in Australia, where I went to school and quickly realized that was not for me. I, I definitely needed some more people interactions. So I took of all things, a bookkeeping job with a small family owned business, they owned a number of coffee franchises and of all things, a fashion agency. Oh, wow. Wow. So I quickly got up to speed on hiring baristas and fashion models of all things and, and haven’t looked back

Ligia:

<laugh>. Wow. And so how did you exactly make the jump specifically? And I don’t know, learn all these things, HR related, the specific passion of yours.

Rachelle:

I, I think it’s just a matter of the need was there and it was a small family own business, so let’s figure it out. And I think we all have an element of that in our career, right. Um, where we’re blazing new trails or we’ve got an idea or there’s an unmet need and you just dive in

Ligia:

And someone took a chance on you. Yeah.

Rachelle:

Someone took a chance. Many people have taken many chances of a, on a, a over my career. So I’m very thankful for that.

Ligia:

That’s excellent. And here we are today on our podcast,

Jason:

Baristas and fashion models. That’s so interesting, but we have a lot more interesting stuff to talk about. So the reason we’re all here is to learn something new and to help us crack the new talent code. So today we’re gonna talk about how the new talent code dictates that we bring more agility into the workplace by changing our mindsets and especially our territorial mindsets. You know, it’s not uncommon for business leaders to be reluctant to share their top performers. And this is something that definitely weighs on. We included <laugh> that definitely weighs on organizations trying to encourage and increase internal mobility. So Rochelle, from your perspective, tell us about your current focus. I love this. Tell us about your current focus on removing silos between business units. I think we talk a lot around HR trying to remove data silos, but I love this around trying to remove management silos.

Rachelle:

So when we think about silos at WD 40 company, we’re thinking about both functional and geographic silos, right? Where we’ve been very traditional in our hierarchies where we’ve got job families and we’ve got territories in countries. And all of those things, those hierarchies are constraining our ability to be agile, right? We are unable to solve problems as quickly as we might if we had, if not removed those silos, but perhaps just soften the edges where we can begin to identify solutions in different parts of the organization. So if sales has a problem, let’s involve our, our finance partners. You know, if marketing’s looking at new strategy, let’s bring sales to the table, but what’s constrained us. I think in the past is the idea that our people, our resources and our time are finite and they are. But if we are encouraging ourselves to think with an infinite mindset and be open to the idea that solutions can come from anywhere, right, you don’t necessarily just have to keep that within your team, within your country.

Rachelle:

We are really expanding. Our opportunities is one of the first things that that we’re looking to do. And it’s essential in our new way of working because we know our people, our future leaders, they don’t wanna be constrained by boundaries, geographies, or even an office. How many students are we speaking with that? I don’t wanna be sitting at a desk. I hear that from vast majority of them. So as we think about being agile and maintaining our competitive advantage with problem solving and innovation, we have to blur these boundaries. We have to break down the silos in order to work differently,

Jason:

But Rochelle, every journey starts with the first step. Was there a specific initiative or project that kind of drove this change in mindset for the organization?

Rachelle:

We saw some early wins with our digital and eCommerce teams. Buying online was really accelerated during the pandemic. As, as we know, we had learning moments as we call them opportunities to get closer to the customer, to make faster decisions in our Amazon team or whether it was in the team all or WEBO space in China, we were bringing these teams together in what we called squads. They span about six different languages, about four or five different countries, but it was changing and evolving so quickly. We didn’t wanna wait for that quarterly meeting. We didn’t wanna wait for that annual meeting where we got the thought leaders together to think about, Hey, what are we gonna do in our Amazon and eCommerce space? No, we brought them together on a monthly basis to share best practices, to share data, to share insights, share with one another, what was working so that they could be more agile. And by decentralizing those decisions and inviting those peer groups together, we create a great outcomes, wonderful solutions, and we could respond really quickly to the business needs.

Ligia:

So are you saying that in essence, you’ve put a project based workplace in, in place, is that what we’re talking about?

Rachelle:

Yes. And I think that’s essential for all roles while we still have project based roles. What we are doing in a more intentional way is carving out project capacity within each of these roles so that we can allow our tribe members as we call ourselves to participate in opportunities when they arise so that they have that capacity to join a project group, to get behind a case study, to figure out a solution to partner with the innovation team on what’s next for the next plan.

Ligia:

It sounds lovely, but I guess I’m an old lady. So I mean, I, that’s a big change in mindset for me as a hiring manager, I’ll be the first one to say, if I hire somebody really good, I want them delivered against my goals. So how exactly, I mean, and I also wanna talk by the way about this tribe concept, which I love, but how did you change the mindset internally with, with the managers to move towards this? Well, to let go of, of people let go of this hoarding <laugh>, um, and really move towards this new way of getting work done.

Rachelle:

So we’re inviting our more autocratic leaders to think about it in a different way to test and learn to trust that their teams know how to best utilize their team to deliver on their expectations. Mm-hmm <affirmative> that trust is a big leap because we are so historically wired to control that, to get the outcomes that we need and that we’re expecting of our teams, but our people are demanding. It mm-hmm <affirmative>. They want the flexibility to be able to work on passion projects, to be able to contribute to things outside of their specific functional area, to help solve problems and be part of a bigger solution. So if we don’t do it, we are limiting and stifling the resources and the talent that we have. And not only that, but we are not allowing them to grow and learn right outside of their particular silo areas. And if we don’t allow them those times at bat to deal with these difficult situations or solve a problem, or come up with an innovative idea, then how can we expect them to do that as they grow in their career or they’re promoted.

Jason:

So Rochelle, this new way of working this new way of kind of managing the organization, I, I have to assume it, it requires a new way of leadership. Has there been kind of learning moments for the leaders in your organization as well

 

Talent Management in an Evolving Workforce

Rachelle:

With an evolving workforce, our emerging leaders of the future, they can no longer lead today the way that they have done in the past. Their mindset is shifting to be more agile in where they get their talent when they engage with them, where they engage with them. For example, if we have a marketing need in Canada, that we are engaging with some of our talent in Istanbul, if we have a need for a data analytics that no longer needs to be in the corporate headquarters, it could be in Canada, it could be in central America. Our leaders are more focused on the, what needs to get done rather than the, where or the how, and our work from where philosophy is enabling them to do that. We work with our leaders to have one on one conversations with the tribe members, for them to share with them, where do you wanna get your work done? When do you wanna get it done? How is it gonna work for you? And that is so critically important because that’s the flexibility that our workforce is looking for, that our student graduates are expecting. We also realize that in a recent survey, 78% of our tribe are caregivers. That is a huge number to consider, right? They either have children in the home or they’re caring for family members inside or outside of the home. So the way that we work has to be vastly different than what it was in, in the past. Otherwise we will lose our competitive advantage.

Ligia:

This is so good. We could even do another full session on

Jason:

It. So Rochelle, one of the things I’ve noticed through this conversation with you is you seem to have very specific naming conventions for different parts of the organization and the culture. So we talked about squads. Can we talk a little bit about tribes? I love that. How did that come to be?

Rachelle:

Our CEO, Gary Ridge, like myself is Australian. And when he was studying the native Australian tribes, he found that there are a lot of characteristics that resembled what he wanted to create in an organization. And those things include ceremony, you know, future focused, specialized skills, learning and teaching and learning. And teaching is the number one responsibility for our tribal leaders and for our coaches. Because if we don’t continually evolve and learn and teach and create that space for our people to grow, then we are shortsighted. We lack the ability to be future focused. So it’s built into our corely performance reviews. Our coaches are evaluated on their ability to develop their people and to prepare them for the next role. It’s a focus on bench building and growing our organization so that we can be sustainable.

Jason:

Well, change and transformation are never easy, but it sounds like there’s some foundational elements of your culture that help make this happen.

Rachelle:

We are very vulnerable with one another, especially in our learning moment and in our maniac pledge. And interestingly, the United States Navy just picked up our maniac pledge whereby we pledge to share information, to seek information and to provide it to those that who need it.

Ligia:

I’m gonna steal that too.

Rachelle:

It works right. And I think it’s another one of these ways that we can break down our territories, that we can share information because quite often we tend to hoard it right as a people, right? The more information you have, the more power that you have, the more control, the more rewards that you get. But we are reversing that thinking the more that we can share and involve others, we can raise the overall boat. And it just gives our tribe more opportunity to celebrate together because we are only as strong as our individual parts, but working together,

Ligia:

Talk about driving a revolution. I love it. I’m gonna take this back to my group and my team. This is like, like a great coaching session itself. Thank you.

Rachelle:

You’re very welcome.

Ligia:

I invite everyone to go check out the w D 40 company. I think, uh, your values, uh, as well as all of this is well exemplified on the site. It’s fascinating.

Rachelle:

Thanks. See, we truly believe that our culture is our advantage and that if we don’t continue to nurture it and celebrate it, we will lose that edge. We have really high engagement, 91% employee engagement globally. I think it speaks to the, the power of the values and, and of our tribal culture,

Ligia:

High engagement. And I bet high retention too.

Rachelle:

Yes. An average of 9.5 years globally is our retention. It’s a lot higher in the Americas.

Jason:

So we’ve talked about what this means for the business. And we’ve talked about what this means for employees and as well as kind of the change in and the shift for managers and leaders. What about what this means for HR? What’s the role for HR in kind of conducting and, and coordinating this type of an approach to a more agile organization.

 

WD-40’s Talent Management Strategy

Rachelle:

There are many roles where we’re invited in. So we have a philosophy at WD 40 company. We don’t go where we’re not invited. So HRS not gonna be banging down the door saying, Hey, we wanna talk with you about being a more agile organization. No, we are creating and asking the questions. What can we do? Think about what our workforce of the future is. We’re challenging them more with questions to construct the, what needs to get done, not the, how mm-hmm, <affirmative>, we’re supporting them with organizational design. We’re working with them on succession planning. We’re thinking about talent gap remediation. We know where we are going. And we have a clear strategy, which we do. Let us help you plan what that resourcing capability is gonna be needed for the today and the tomorrow.

Ligia:

So this concept was it organically brought about, I mean, it sounds like HR didn’t push it. It sounds like HR supported it, or I should say the talent function supported. It was it organically grown. And I gotta tell you, I still have anxiety. I want to trust, but it gives me a little bit of anxiety. So did you do a pilot or something like for our listeners? How would you ease managers? Old people like me into this concept, which I love, but, you know, theoretically, I don’t know if I could let go.

Rachelle:

So test and learn. You know, we, we encourage them to start with smaller projects. We point to areas where we’ve had success, like with our global digital squads, where we’ve invited the rest of the organization into our branding strategy, into our learning spaces. And if it’s not working, encourage them to pivot, like find a new way, but ask your people. You may have one idea of what the construct looks like to deliver the result, but engage our talent. We have so much like many organizations, incredibly passionate, very curious people ask them, how can we go about getting this done? We’re finding more and more as they let go. They’re getting the result. As long as they’re clear on the front end about the, what needs to happen and allowing and empowering our people to get the work done.

Jason:

So I love this concept of squads. I think it’s great. It really puts a phrase and acknowledges the way work gets done. Work isn’t necessarily done the way an org chart looks. It’s done based off of who can contribute to the team. And what’s the work at hand, but let’s talk about where the rubber meets the road or the bras tacks here. What happens after the project’s done? What’s the next step? You mentioned supporting internal mobility. How does this lead into that type of, uh, of a process?

Rachelle:

So by allowing our people to work on projects, either in their functional area or, or outside their traditional geographies, they’re creating opportunities for themselves. So they’re now on the radar for that next role, a lateral move within our organization. So in north America, we have 60% of our internal positions are from promotion which is a huge number. We’ve got people going from marketing to human resources. We’ve got folks going from innovation to sales. They’re becoming more well rounded tribe members so that they have a bigger picture and expectation of, of the whole organization. And by doing this, we are building our bench in so many different areas. We’re not just siloing the finance people to this is your finance career path. Right now, we’ve got one of our senior finance directors looking at a commercial role in Latin America, because he has been involved in those projects. He is familiar with the work that needs to be done. He’s bringing his financial skillset, but in a different way, we’re focused more on the competencies rather than the experience, because that allows us, as we said, at the beginning, our conversation to pivot, to try new things, experiment in new roles, we focused on cultivating innovation, driving for results, valuing differences, instilling trust, demonstrating self awareness and nimble learning. Because without learning, we are gonna be stagnant.

Ligia:

You touched a little bit on this earlier in terms of you’re very much in touch with the San Diego student population and their needs and wants, and the new generations looking for jobs. Does this change your hiring profile in terms of I’m gonna call it the flexibility you look for in people? Because I’m wondering if I could work at WD 40, I’m a dinosaur. I don’t, maybe I couldn’t come in and adapt to this. You know, it gives me anxiety. I want to trust, but could I adapt to this project based workplace? And so does it change your hiring profile? Do you look for this in people you hire?

Rachelle:

We do. Yes. And it all starts with a values alignment and the ability to, and willingness to learn and grow. So as we promote what I call gig, work, internal gig work or crowdsourcing internally, right? To solve for some of these constraints that we have on time, talent and treasure. We are wanting people who are willing, who have the curiosity to contribute to projects. It’s no longer an, an expectation that you just check in and check out that you continue doing your role the way you’ve done it, right for the past, you know, four or five years, we are expecting everyone to have a digital mindset. We need to be thinking about how to become more efficient, more creative, more innovative. And it is definitely part of our hiring strategy and our EVP.

Jason:

So we’ve gone through almost a, a decade, if not more of universities and career centers talking about the shift in work and how this was gonna happen. This project based employment, I’ve been talking about it so long that I’ve been saying organizations are gonna have to find ways to generate project based employment within their four walls. And we don’t even have walls anymore. Right? So every time I’ve mentioned this kind of project based employment and project based career over the last few years, the reaction I get is, wow. That sounds really harsh. That sounds tough on this podcast, we’ve had previous guests that have talked about career durability. I loved what you said around creating opportunity for yourself and increasing visibility. I think the kind of process you’ve put around this shows that this can be done with care.

Rachelle:

Absolutely. And it’s not to say that you wouldn’t necessarily have your core functional area, right? Whether it be finance, marketing, or sales, but to also create capacity for project work, because our students are expecting that they’re not expecting just to sit at their desk and focus on specific functional role. They want to contribute. They want exposure to the broader organization. They wanna work with colleagues internationally, whether it be virtually or in person. That is an expectation I’m hearing from university students and high school students. They want that personal touch, and they also want that invitation in. And if we are not inviting them, they’re gonna go somebody else and look for it in a different way, in a different place.

Ligia:

So let’s say I hire this finance person. What’s the expectation roughly in terms of number of hours they spend doing. And I don’t know if you do this in hours, doing finance work a number of hours or effort doing project based work.

Rachelle:

So it can vacillate depending on the role and depending on the project. So when we post our positions internally, our project work internally, we are very clear on the front end, what the commitment would be in terms of number of hours and timeline. So can I commit to that? Can I create capacity in my day in order to throw my hat in the ring for this particular project does a general rule of thumb. We are looking for about 15 to 20% of any individual’s role to have that capacity to contribute to projects.

Ligia:

And then how does that change now? Now I’m like got a million ideas, performance management, you know, compensation, succession planning, succession planning, it changes all the constructs. So how, I don’t know. I mean, we could go on for hours on this podcast, but like, how does that change? Some of the initial sort of most obvious HR processes and constructs,

Rachelle:

It blows succession up because now we’ve opened our internal talent pools outside of traditional silos, traditional functional areas where we can have what we call an air in spare. So it isn’t necessarily, okay. You are next in line for this position. It could be, you are available to be considered for this role. And guess what? So are two or three of your other peers because they’ve demonstrated that they are interested in this work and that they are capable now from a performance management standpoint, having matrix organizations or having solid lines and dotted line reporting. We have a philosophy where the tribe member self evaluates. So you don’t necessarily have to have a coach. We don’t call ’em managers. The coach necessarily doesn’t have to be involved in every project that the tribe member’s working on because the tribe member will come forward with their self-evaluation every quarter. Here’s how I’ve performed. Here’s where I believe my gaps are. Here are the projects I contributed to. And then the coach’s question is how can I support you? How can I support you in your learning and your development to do more, to experience more, to contribute in ways that you wanna contribute?

Ligia:

You know, what I love about this too, is it provides visibility when you’re really evaluating talent and doing succession planning. You have a really limited view of individuals and their capabilities, as well as their potential. It’s typically within the line of management that they report into in this case, we’re talking about finance, right? And the fact that you’re doing project based work means that other managers are exposed to that individual’s skills, capabilities, and potential as well, but have actual evidence of projects that they’ve worked on, that they can point to. So in many ways it’s actually more equitable. You’re actually leveling the playing field.

Rachelle:

Absolutely. And that is a big part of our diversity equity and inclusion program is that we want to be more equitable cuz as leaders, we always tap our go-to people, right? Oh, I know Dave can do this. Susan’s demonstrated she she’s going to knock this out of the park for me, but we are not potentially exploring all of the talent in our organization. So if we have a crowdsourcing mindset and we’re asking people to nominate or self volunteer their interest or their capability into a project, we are now getting exposure to people that we may not have otherwise done. Not only in your country, but internationally. So now we are bringing, you know, somebody from marketing into the innovation discussion that’s happening in the, in the us, we’ve got cross pollination. It is far more equitable. We’re opening the opportunities for everybody.

Jason:

I know you said kind of test and pilot, but is there kind of maybe a key lesson learned that you can share? I mean, you can change the names to protect the innocent, but is there like a key lessons learned that you can share around maybe something that didn’t go the way you expected and then maybe a piece of advice for people getting started on this journey?

Rachelle:

One of the things that we have found is where leaders put the breaks on when they’re not sure about what is happening or why it’s happening and they interject or pull out one of their resources. And I think it’s that fear of the unknown that they’re not intimately involved in the project. They don’t understand what’s happening or they don’t necessarily have clarity around what the objective is that historically our leaders have been very involved in checking all of those boxes. I know exactly what my resource for Amazon is going to be doing, how she’s using her time. And I think that has been a learning moment for us, that we’re encouraging our leaders to trust in the process, trust in your people. And so we’ve had some false starts. We’ve had projects where tribe members have thrown their name in the, in the ring. So to speak and leaders have said, whoa, whoa, I didn’t know about this. I didn’t know that you were involved. So we are doing a better job at setting expectations on the front end and inviting our leaders to think with more of an infinite mindset.

Ligia:

Rochelle, one of the things we try to do in this podcast is give a lot of practical advice. And I’m assuming there’s a lot of change management involved with this. So if it’s gonna be, let’s say a company or one of our listeners wants to move towards a project based workplace, what would be your advice? What are some of the critical, maybe three to five things that are going to be necessary for this to actually be successful or to move in this direction?

Rachelle:

I think the first thing to do is carve out that project capacity in the role. So ask yourself, what can we stop doing? What does that report that we don’t need to generate? What is that meeting? We don’t necessarily need to attend? What can we stop doing in order to create capacity for these projects? Cuz the projects are important. There’s gonna be a big impact at the end of them. So I think that’s the first thing to do is for each coach to ask their tribe member, what can you stop doing to create yourself time and space for this? The other thing is to provide a place for us at SharePoint, where we can post these project positions so that we can be equitable and everybody has visibility to them. Everyone is the opportunity to throw the name in the hat that requires branding. It requires some framework.

Rachelle:

It requires some discipline to do that and start small. We’ve started with small projects. One of them is reverse mentoring. If anyone’s interested in a reverse mentoring position, please reach out to or submit your name here. And it’s open to all functions. It’s really big in the eCommerce and digital space that we’re, our leaders are looking for reverse mentorship positions, but starts more. But you also very clear about what the project parameters are in terms of timeline, time zones and languages. In some cases we don’t necessarily have to have project teams in English. Most of them are, but if we’re looking for a collaboration in perhaps our Spanish speaking group, then be really clear about what that is. And then finally measure success, provide that feedback loop to the leaders. This is what the goal was. This is who contributed. And this is the result that we achieved and be very honest with one another about where we fell short, we have this philosophy of learning moment, a WD 40 company that if, if we failed, that’s great. Let’s share that failure with everybody to make sure we don’t repeat it and let’s figure out how to do it differently. Next time I

Ligia:

Love the transparency.

Jason:

That’s great practical advice to help our listeners put approaches like this into action. So we wanna thank you for the discussion. We could probably keep talking for the rest of the afternoon, but we know you have other things to do and to get back to work. But we have a tradition of ending our show with a question about potential. So if someone had believed in your potential to pursue a different career path than the one you’re in today, where would you be today? What other passion would you have pursued even maybe before trying accounting

Rachelle:

<laugh> well, if my VP of sales is listening, he often invites me to consider a role in his organization. Something I have considered from time to time, but um, I’m really fascinated with supply chain. I just think getting product to shelf from concept to innovation, to shelf either physical shelf or digital shelf is super fascinating. So perhaps in another life or I’ll reincarnate as a supply chain and partner in some way or shape or form. Yeah.

Jason:

We’ll have to explore, uh, if there’s a supply chain project available for you to spend some of your time <laugh> this has been a wonderful conversation. We just wanted to thank you for joining us today. And for everyone listening, hopefully you have some takeaways to help you crack the new talent code. Thanks

Ligia:

So much everyone. See you next

Rachelle:

Time. Thank you. Take care.

Ligia:

Thanks for listening to the new talent code. This is a podcast produced by eightfold AI. If you’d like to learn more about us, please visit us at eightfold.ai and you can find us on all your favorite social media sites. We’d love to connect and continue the conversation.

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